Día de Muertos - Day of the Dead

“Day Of The Dead” A holiday were Mexicans feel more alive than ever!

While many have taken on the tradition of trick or treating on Halloween,  here in Mexico the ultimate celebration is “The Day Of The Dead,” which goes on for a couple of days.

Legend has it that many believe the gates of heaven are opened at midnight on October 31, for the spirits of all deceased children to reunite with their families for 24 hours. On November 2, the spirits of the adults come down to enjoy the festivities that are prepared for them.

 

In many homes, beautiful altars (ofrendas) are made in honor of a loved one who passed away. They are decorated with candles, buckets of flowers (wild marigolds called cempasuchil ) mounds of fruit, peanuts, plates of what once was their favorite meals, and a special sweet bread, called pan de muerto (bread of the dead). The altar needs to have lots of food, bottles of soda, hot cocoa and water for the weary spirits. Toys and candies are left for the angelitos (little angels), and on Nov. 2, shots of mezcal are offered to the adult spirits. Little folk art skeletons and sugar skulls, purchased at open-air markets, provide the final touches.

 Ofrendas  Source:  The Resort at Pedregal

Ofrendas

Source: The Resort at Pedregal

There are many unique souvenirs made for this time of year during local markets, as well as restaurants decked out with Dia de los Muertos decor all across town. If you are planning on visiting during this time, allow for our concierge team to help you find activities for you and your loved ones to experience this special tradition.

It's such a uniquely Mexican event that truly captures the spirit of the nation.

 Pan de Muerto  Source:  The Resort at Pedregal

Pan de Muerto

Source: The Resort at Pedregal